Emperor Constantine and Fathers of the First Council of Nicaea 325 A.D. holding the Nicene Creed in its 385 A.D. form


 


 

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GailAllen.com

Old Testament Apocrypha,
Pseudepigrapha
and
Other Sacred Writings

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Deuterocanonical Apocrypha

Deuterocanonical is a term first coined in 1566 by the theologian Sixtus of Siena to describe scriptural texts of the Old Testament whose canonicity was explicitly defined for Catholics by the Council of Trent. Their acceptance among early Christians was not universal, but regional councils in the West published official canons that included these books as early as the fourth and fifth centuries.

The Catholic deuterocanonical scriptural texts as defined by the Council of Trent and following the listing of The New English Bible are:

 

 

Pseudepigrapha

Pseudepigrapha [Gr.,=things falsely ascribed], meaning "books with false titles," refers to books similar in type to those of the Bible whose authors gave them the names of persons of a much earlier period in order to enhance their authority. The Pseudepigrapha is a collection of early Jewish and some Jewish-Christian writings composed between c.200 B.C. and c.A.D. 200, not found in the Bible or rabbinic writings.